Gateway Market

Witch hunt or campaign strategy?

Dear Friends,

Secretary of State Matt Schultz knows better. He knows there is no voter fraud problem in Iowa. He knew this before he decided to spend half a million dollars to disgorge 16 people (out of over 2 million voters) who voted illegally. He knows that in the rare instance when someone votes illegally it is usually a mistake.

So, what is Matt Schultz’s witch hunt really about? His campaign for governor. No, not in 2014. Schultz is smart enough not to challenge Branstad in a Republican primary. (The only Republican silly enough to do that would be Bob Vander Plaats, who has found a new way to be silly and will probably announce his campaign for the U.S. Senate shortly after the first of the year. Vander Plaats will likely win that primary. Congratulations, U.S. Senate-elect Bruce Braley. But I digress.)

No, Schultz is smart enough to save his gubernatorial bid for 2018. The seat will be wide open, and Schultz would have spent eight years traversing the state, getting lots of press on a non-issue that, nonetheless, polls favorably. It’s exactly what Chet Culver did as Secretary of State for eight years en route to being elected Governor in 2006, although instead of stumping to suppress the vote, Culver at least talked about improving voter turnout.

We can’t know for sure how things will play out. But one thing is certain: the office of Secretary State is pretty much a stepping stone to higher office. The only SOS in recent memory who actually cared about the job itself was Mike Mauro. Pity he got beat.

Monday, from 4:15-5:15, Des Moines attorney Joseph Glazebrook is my guest as we discuss the Secretary of State’s voter-fraud witch hunt. And I see U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (a.k.a., presidential candidate Ted Cruz) now has a coloring book. Maybe Matt Schultz should crack down on this blatant attempt to lure under-age voters to the polls.

Tuesday, at the usual time of 6:00-6:30 pm, Dr. Charles Goldman joins me, and has this to say about our conversation: “Roe v Wade may still be the law of the land, but ‘pro-life’ advocates have found new ways around it via ‘fetal personhood’ laws enforced against mothers who do unhealthy things while pregnant. In one such case, a mother was brought to court but not allowed a defense lawyer, although her fetus did have legal representation. The legal precedent for this? The Dred Scott decision of 1857.”

Wednesday, 6:00-6:30, Mike Carberry joins me to discuss the divide in the climate-change movement over nuclear power.

Thursday, 6:00-6:30, Rob Hach with the Iowa Wind Energy Association joins us. Most of what’s happening in wind energy is extremely positive, and we’ll talk with Rob about some of the latest developments. But with any new initiative comes growing pains. Do recent lawsuits involving the death of eagles and condemnation of farmland for transmission lines throw significant wrinkles into wind energy’s forward momentum? Or are these small bumps in the road?

Join us live, Monday 4:15-5:15 pm and Tuesday-Thursday 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

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Democrats’ Ugly Stepsister

Dear Friends,

I like all the candidates in the Democratic Primary for Governor. But I’m not supporting any of them. My support goes to . . . fairness!

And the way the media and the Iowa Democratic Party have marginalized candidate Bob Krause is blatantly unfair. Krause, like candidates Jack Hatch and Tyler Olson, served in the Iowa Legislature. Like Hatch, Krause ran unsuccessfully for higher office. Like Hatch and Olson, Krause is articulate and intelligent and focuses on important issues. (Ok, when it comes to focusing on issues, Hatch and Krause more so than Olson, whose campaign message is more about image than issues.)

So, why is The Des Moines Register treating Krause like the campaign’s ugly stepsister? And why did the Iowa Democratic Party prevent Krause from speaking at its big annual event this fall? The media and political establishment have no trouble covering a seven-way presidential primary. Why limit gubernatorial primaries to two candidates?

Well, if the Establishment wants a two-candidate-only primary, perhaps it will be Hatch vs Krause now that Olson’s campaign imploded last week with the announcement of his divorce. In a perfect world, voters would not judge Olson’s fitness for public office based on a divorce. And even though commentators and Olson’s supporters are spinning this as no big deal politically, it will indeed be a big deal to many voters in next June’s Democratic Primary. It would be an even bigger deal to General Election voters next November, should Olson win the primary.

My prediction? Olson is toast in this election, though if he handles his exit strategy with grace and begins to show some legislative accomplishments over the next few years, he could still have a promising political future. And keep an eye on AFSCME, the public employees union, which endorsed Olson last month. If AFSCME’s activity on Olson’s behalf is minimal or non-existent over the next few weeks, that’s a pretty good sign that Olson’s campaign is on the rocks. Finally, if Olson drops out sooner rather than later, don’t be surprised to see another prominent Democrat jump into the race, as there are plenty of Party insiders that can’t stand Hatch.

Monday, in a special hour-long broadcast (promoting KHOI 89.1 FM’s seasonal fund drive) from 4:15-5:15 p.m., Steffen Schmidt joins me to discuss how “a paralyzed federal government is leading to states and even cities taking matters into their own hands,” to quote from one of Steffen’s recent opinion pieces. Also on the docket for today, my thoughts on: (1) The Democratic Primary for Governor, (2) Rush Limbaugh calling Pope Francis a Marxist, (3) The shooting last week on Des Moines’ southside, and (4) Where Would Baby Jesus Shop? Amazon or Wal-mart? Answer: Neither.

Tuesday, at the usual time of 6:00 pm, Drake President David Maxwell joins me to discuss President Obama’s controversial proposal on higher education. I also talk with Shuji Mintzmyer of the Iowa Zen Center in northeast Iowa.

Wednesday at 6:00 pm, Climate Marcher John Jorgenson of Arizona is my guest. Other topics for Wednesday’s program to be announced.

Thursday at 6:00 pm, Madi Delk with Des Moines Onstage tells us about the upcoming performance of “I Have Before Me A Remarkable Document Given To Me By A Young Lady From Rwanda,” a student-led production happening this weekend. Other topics for Thursday’s program to be announced.

Join us live, Monday 4:15-5:15 pm and Tuesday-Thursday 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

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Treat the Arts like sports

Dear Friends,

The second thing I did this morning after pouring a strong cup of tea was to respond to Facebook friends Max Wellman, Sky Damon and John Earl Robinson for bemoaning the lack of support for the Arts:

“Oh, you silly artsy people. Everyone knows that the only folks who squander their time pursuing the Arts professionally either have no common sense or lack practical skills . . . skills like throwing a football, or like bashing the guy who throws the football, or like selling overpriced hotdogs to the guy who paid way too much for a ticket to see the throwing and the bashing. Gee, you guys just don’t get economics, do ya?” (See the complete exchange here.)

The conversation was in response to an excellent commentary in The New York Times by Gary Gutting, who writes, “Despite our general preference for capitalism, our support for sports is essentially socialist, with local and state governments providing enormous support for professional teams. To cite just one striking example, the Minnesota State Legislature recently appropriated over $500 million to help build the Vikings a new stadium. At the same time, the Minnesota Orchestra {is} close to financial disaster”.

Gutting also points out that “taxpayer money provides more than a billion dollars annually in tax exemptions and stadium subsidies for N.F.L. teams.” That’s just for one sport! Meanwhile, the annual budget for the National Endowment for the Arts languishes at a mere $154 million, well below what the agency used to receive in the mid-90s, prior to Chairman Newt’s anti-cultural revolution.

And yet, like a beacon in the wilderness of aesthetic depravity, Des Moines shines out as the Cultural and Culinary Crossroads of the Continent. We’ll talk about some of those shining lights on this week’s Fallon Forum.

Monday, attorney Joseph Glazebrook joins me to discuss Hobby Lobby’s lawsuit contending they should be exempt on religious grounds from covering birth control for employees. If time allows, we may also discuss the judicial impact of the projected 1,000-inmate increase in Iowa’s prison population over the next decade. And if even more time allows, we’ll get Joseph’s take on this week’s trial of Judge Stephanie Rose, accused of employment retaliation.

Tuesday, we talk with Bob Cook, a retired minister training to go the distance with next year’s Climate March. We also talk with Elizabeth Adams of the Iowa Dance Theatre regarding the upcoming performance of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker.

Wednesday, Carl Voss and Ellery Duke join me to discuss concerns raised in a NY Times article, “Is It Ok to Kill Cyclists?“,  regarding the disturbing frequency with which drivers are not even cited, let alone fined, after morphing a biker into roadkill. Also, Shawn Wilson with Repertory Theater of Iowa talks about this year’s performance of A Christmas Carol.

Thursday, attorney Jim Larew and State Rep. Dan Kelley discuss Governor Branstad’s evisceration of funding for Amtrak in Iowa – even as other states see a growth in ridership. Check out Jim’s column here. We also discuss wind energy, specifically the first-ever lawsuit involving a company fined for one of its turbines killing eagles, and land-use conflicts over the use of eminent domain to build transmission lines for transporting electricity generated by wind.

Join us live, Monday from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Business Sponsors
Community CPA & Associates
Corazon Coffee Roasters
Dianna’s Wedding Cakes
Entouch Therapy Services
Fighting Burrito
Gateway Market
HoQ Restaurant
Ritual Cafe
Tally’s Restaurant Bar & Catering
The Book Store

Military “gets” climate crisis . . or does it?

Dear Friends,

I’m an optimist, and believe that despite the growing impacts of the climate crisis, humanity will emerge from the 21st century a wiser, more balanced species. Part of the problem is we can’t see, smell or taste the culprit. But unless you’re a member of the Flat Earth Society, you know what’s wrong – and it concerns you deeply that CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is now 400 parts per million (ppm) – and rising.

I’m an optimist, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t days when the news isn’t depressing, or a mixed bag at best. In the mixed bag department . . .

Who “gets” climate change? The US military . . . sort of. They’re expanding activities in the Arctic, due to shrinking polar ice and new security and economic challenges. Unfortunately, one of those “challenges” is cashing-in on the region’s untapped oil and natural gas reserves. So, even though military leaders understand the cause of climate change, they’ll secure the region for corporations to extract more fossil fuels, thus worsening the climate crisis.

I am reminded of the expression, “When you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop digging.” Can someone please share that with Defense Secretary Hagel . . . and with President Obama?

On this topic, whatever happened to peak oil? Dr. Charles Goldman writes: “Not enough CO2 in the atmosphere from the fossil fuels reserves we already know about? How about a source of hydrocarbons that might be twice as abundant as all other fossil fuels combined? We’re talking about methane hydrate, and the question of what happens if we never run out of oil?”

Yike! This is news to me, and it doesn’t sound good. Monday, from 5:30-6:30 pm (note the longer program), Charles and I are all over this topic, and we take a look at the “accomplishments” of last week’s climate summit in Warsaw, too.

Tuesday, I’m joined by Mark Taylor-Canfield, a writer and frequent contributor to national radio shows with Thom Hartmann, Norman Goldman, Jeff Santos, Brad Bannon and Mike Malloy. Mark and I discuss the interesting election news coming out of Washington State, with a focus on Initiative 522, which would require labeling of food with genetically modified organisms as ingredients. The election is so close, the results are still in limbo.

Join us live, Monday from 5:30-6:30 pm and Tuesday from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Business Sponsors
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Corazon Coffee Roasters
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Entouch Therapy Services
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Gateway Market
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The Book Store

Pitbull lawsuit, Batkid and the real issues

Dear Friends,

Okay, two admittedly smaller issues are stuck in my craw today:

1. Does anyone else have a problem with “Batkid?” I’m talking about the five-year-old suffering from leukemia who got to play Batman’s sidekick for a day in San Francisco. The entire town got into the act. It had to have cost a huge chunk of change. Couldn’t that money have been better spent treating sick kids from families without insurance? Or on medical research? Or on simpler, low-budget “make-a-wish”events for a whole lot more sick kids?

2. What’s up with the Crawfordsville man who is suing for $320,000 because the City took away his pitbull after it allegedly bit a woman? According to Register writer Lee Rood, the man claims that having his dog removed caused him to gain 70 pounds. He also says his dog suffered incontinence because of the City’s action. Please! If our judicial system has any integrity, this case will be thrown out the nearest window at the speed of that pitbull charging its next victim.

So, we’ll talk about those two things today. But only briefly. I promise.

On to bigger issues. . . Monday, in a special one-hour broadcast from 5:15-6:15 p.m., Dr. Charles Goldman and I discuss the remarkably incompetent kick-off to the ACA’s health insurance exchange. Then we talk about New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. Is Christie the Republican Party’s only hope to win the presidency? Given Christie’s track record in New Jersey, do we really want him as President? And is there any chance of him actually winning the Republican nomination, especially in states like Iowa? To help answer these and other pressing Christie questions, we are joined by NJ resident and Charles’ brother, Dr. Steve Goldman.

Tuesday, we interview Des Moines City Council candidates Bill Gray and Sean Bagniewski.

Wednesday, comedian Ben Gran joins us to talk about his upcoming show. And I’ll dig into the Democratic primary for governor a bit. Did AFSCME just shoot itself in the foot . . . again? And you’ll never guess which recent commentator I find myself most in agreement with on the race? Chet Culver.

Thursday, former Polk County Republican Party chair turned independent Chad Brown joins us. I’ll also tell you about Jerry Rhoads, the gubernatorial candidate who wants to eliminate nursing home regulations. Surprise, surprise! Jerry owns a nursing home that is constantly being cited for violations. But wait. Wouldn’t Jerry be better off just supporting Gov. Branstad? The two agree on this issue.

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm (5:15-6:15 today, Monday) on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Business Sponsors
Community CPA & Associates
Corazon Coffee Roasters
Dianna’s Wedding Cakes
Entouch Therapy Services
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Gateway Market
HoQ Restaurant
Ritual Cafe
Tally’s Restaurant Bar & Catering
The Book Store

Was Shooting Justified?

Dear Friends,

The police chase and shooting death on the Iowa State University campus last week has been the subject of much conversation, not just in Iowa but across the country. Was the use of deadly force by the police officer justified? What was going on in the driver’s mind as he was tearing around campus? At what point does one’s vehicle become a deadly weapon?

Monday, attorney Joseph Glazebrook and Dr. Charles Goldman join me to analyze the tragic event at ISU last week. We also discuss the Greece v. Galloway case before the U.S. Supreme Court, addressing prayer at city council meetings.

Tuesday, local farmer Mark Peterson joins us to discuss water quality, and Suman Hoque with HoQ Restaurant talks about the growth in the local foods movement. We may also weigh-in on the debate over SNAP, a.k.a., food stamps.

Wednesday, we talk with Jon Neiderbach, who is throwing his hat into the race for State Auditor on the Democratic ticket. We also discuss climate change in light of the tragic typhoon which struck the Philippines last week.

Thursday, we talk with Joe Henry, candidate for Des Moines City Council in the upcoming special election. We also talk with Joe about the efforts of LULAC (League of United Latin American Citizens) and other organizations to confront voter suppression, both here in Iowa and most egregiously in Texas.

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Business Sponsors
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Corazon Coffee Roasters
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Fighting Burrito
Gateway Market
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The Book Store

Vote!

Dear Friends,

Tomorrow is a big day in Iowa. It’s Election Day, and in 950 cities across the state, voters will elect city council members and, in some cases, mayors. If recent trends are any indication, turnout will be embarrassingly low. Voting tomorrow is a good idea for three reasons:

1. Voting makes a difference! Lest we forget, George Bush beat Al Gore by only 200 votes in the 2000 General Election. (Okay, the other school of thought says Bush didn’t actually win but was appointed by the US Supreme Court. But we won’t go there today.) And as a state lawmaker I sat between Becky Reynolds, who won her first election by 142 votes, and Bill Witt, who won his first election by only 16 votes. Iowa is a better place because of their service.

2. Local officials are (or should be) accessible. Arguably, local government has a more profound impact on our day-to-day lives than any other level of government. You can call Des Moines City Councilman Skip Moore and say, “Hey Skip, what’s this bug eating my redbud tree?” There’s a good chance Skip’ll be out there to look at your tree the next day. Try getting that kind of response from your state or federal elected officials.

3. Democracy depends on it! Sure, there are plenty of other things democracy depends on. Freedom of speech. The right to assemble. Public education. Strong local economies. Baseball. But who we elect to represent us, the folks in charge of enacting laws and ordinances, is critical. We want good people doing that, do we not? Letting a bunch of zombies run city government is not going to be good for you or your redbud tree. Fortunately, in Des Moines at least, we are not at risk of zombies winning any of the three seats on the ballot. All of the candidates are respectable, non-flesh eating types. And I thank those who came on my program and share their views: Skip Moore, Cal Woods, Chris Diebel, Bill Gray and Jean Minahan.

Monday, Jonathan Neiderbach and I preview this week’s Des Moines City Council election. We also look at the $81 million proposal for courthouse improvements and expansion in Polk County. We take a look at some of the city council races in metro suburbs as well.

Tuesday, we have an extended program (5:30-6:30) and discuss last week’s developments on the climate-change front. We talk with Kathleen McQuillen of American Friends Service Committee about drones. Josh Mandelbaum of the Environmental Law and Policy Center joins us to discuss the ongoing conflict over Iowa’s water quality. And Cheryl Thomas with Iowans for Gun Safety weighs in on the latest tragic school shooting in Nevada.

Wednesday, Graham Gillette joins Jonathan Neiderbach and me for a review of the outcome of Tuesday’s election. We also discuss the shape of next year’s statewide and federal elections. And we remind folks of the upcoming Immigrant Entrepreneurs Summit on November 9th at Drake University.

Thursday, State Rep. Dan Kelley is back in the studio with us. And we talk with Michael Garvin with the Caribbean Renewable Energy Consortium.

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Why the contempt for food stamps?

Dear Friends,

What’s behind the Tea Party contempt for food stamps? No similar criticism is leveled at farm subsidies by Tea Party members, many who receive farm payments in abundance. Congressman Steve King (arguably the head of the US House Tea Party Caucus), has proposed a $20 billion cut to food stamps even as he and his son have hauled in over $1.2 million in farm subsidies during the past 16 years.

Blatant hypocrisy is not, of course, limited to elected Tea Party members. Check out this vitriolic cartoon, sent to me by a friend who points out that the stay-at-home mom who shared it with her is married to a guy with a nice taxpayer-funded military job.

Monday, Dr. Charles Goldman and I definitively answer once and for all the perplexing age-old question: “Why do Republicans hate food stamps?”

Tuesday, we discuss the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy one year later, and in other climate news, we look at the horrific wildfires raging across Australia. We also further analyze the proposed $81 million referendum for Polk County’s court system.

Wednesday, we get an update on the Immigrant Entrepreneurs Summit from Souvanna Southammavong. We also talk with at-large Des Moines City Council candidate Chris Diebel.

Thursday, we talk with first ward Des Moines City Council candidate Jean Minahan. Then Ed discusses Democrat Bill Knapp’s endorsement of Governor Branstad and ponders the question, “Why is it that Democrats with money are allowed to support non-Democrats whereas I still get the crap kicked out of me ten years later for supporting Ralph Nader?”

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Fallon Forum by the numbers:
- Online audience: 1,809 per program
- Total viewership in third quarter: 402,474
- Website traffic: 13,000 unique visitors (43,000 total visits) per month
- Weekly e-mail list: 5,600
- Facebook universe: 5,000 on personal page, 5,030 on professional page
- KHOI 89.1 Ames
- KPVL 89.1 Postville

Civil War II?

My friend and frequent co-host, Dr. Charles Goldman asks, “Is there a method to the Tea Party madness? Perhaps they are truly looking to start this country’s second Civil War.”

My response: (1) Yes, the Tea Party is exhibiting more than a little madness; (2) No, there is no method or even strategy to the madness; and (3) Careful, Charles. Let’s not imply any overt connection between the Tea Party and the South.  Some of the maddest tea partiers are northerners, with our own Steve King a contender for Head Mad Hatter. And while I haven’t seen any polls on the question, I suspect only a small fraction of Southerners are interested in another war, civil or otherwise.

But why let Charles and I have all the fun? Join us Monday (today) at 6:00 p.m. as we talk Tea Party, the resolved (for now) shutdown and debt ceiling battles, and the prospects of a second Civil War. Call-in at (855) 244-0077.

Tuesday, we talk with Drake law professor Jerry Foxhoven, who chaired the Governor’s task force to investigate problems at the Iowa Juvenile Home in Toledo. We also talk with conservative activist Shane Vander Hart about the right’s opposition to core curriculum standards in public education.

Wednesday, we talk with Souvanna Southammavong about the upcoming Immigrant Entrepreneurs Summit. And former Polk County Supervisor E.J. Giovannetti serves on a committee asking voters in Polk County to approve an $81 million bond referendum to address county courthouse concerns. If organized opposition has surfaced on this vote, I’m not aware of it. Personally, I’m not convinced its needed, but maybe E.J. can change my mind.

Thursday, we talk with Galen Baughman, Communications Director for International CURE (Citizens United for the Rehabilitation of Errants) on the problems associated with states’ punitive laws on civil commitment relevant to sex offenders. In addition to his appearance on today’s program, Galen will speak at Grace Methodist Church, 3800 Cottage Grove this coming Sunday, October 27th, from 1:30-3:30.

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed

Fallon Forum by the numbers:
- Online audience: 1,809 per program
- Total viewership in third quarter: 402,474
- Website traffic: 13,000 unique visitors (43,000 total visits) per month
- Weekly e-mail list: 5,600
- Facebook universe: 5,000 on personal page, 5,030 on professional page
- KHOI 89.1 Ames
- KPVL 89.1 Postville

 

Tea Party Tango

Dear Friends,

Whether the topic is the government shutdown, health care or climate change, it’s hard to debate a Tea Party activist who doesn’t feel constrained by facts or logic. But I gave it my best this weekend on Dave Price’s “The Insiders.” Let me know what you think.

We have a fascinating line-up of guests on the program this week:

Monday, Kevin Barrett discusses, “The American Resistance,” a book he co-authored with Jim Fetzer that purports to “connect the dots between resistance efforts against the American Empire and the White Rose resistance against Hitler.” We also talk with Climate Reality activist Kat Haber, who just returned this week from the World Wilderness Congress in Spain, about the significance of the permafrost loss in her home state of Alaska.

Tuesday, we dig into the GMO debate and talk with Mary Hanson Harrison with Womens International League for Peace and Freedom about some of the events organized this week opposing genetically modified crops. I’m very excited to have Frances Moore Lappe, author of “Diet for a Small Planet,” join us, too. And we are working to confirm Jim Hightower, former Texas Agriculture Commissioner.

Wednesday, Bill Gray, candidate for Des Moines City Council is my guest. And Steffen Schmidt, a.k.a. Dr. Politics, joins us to discuss the government shutdown, assorted tea party mischief, and how the current Washington, DC fiasco is likely to resolve.

Thursday, David Courard-Hauri, Associate Professor of Environmental Science and Policy at Drake University, discusses a recent scientific report showing how areas in the tropics are projected to experience unprecedented climates within a decade. An article about the report says “rapid change will tamper with the functioning of Earth’s biological systems, forcing species to either move in an attempt to track suitable climates, stay and try to adapt to the new climate, or go extinct.”

Join us live, Monday-Thursday, from 6:00-6:30 pm on the Fallon Forum website. Call-in at (855) 244-0077 and add your voice to the dialogue. Video and audio-only podcasts available after the program. The Fallon Forum also can be heard on KHOI 89.1 (Ames) Wednesdays at 5:00 pm and KPVL 89.1 (Postville) Wednesdays at 7:00 pm. Thanks!

Ed